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20110701
20110731
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of pakistan that will bring success to local areas. a country from kabul, it will never happen. we are wasting time and money. the fact we are leaving may assist in the development of stability in local areas. they will never be a centrally governed pakistan, i mean afghanistan. afghanistan is not like iraq. give me one more second and i'll tell you what i think is going to happen in iraq. we'll probably go back to having one bloodthirsty tyrant to rule the country. that's the irony of iraq. >> happy days, wes. >> afghanistan is extraordinarily tribal. it's difficult to have a conversation about afghanistan. one story i loved was one of the things we did in afghanistan when i was working with the civil affairs team, giving out flags to children and local leaders. they would look at the flag and say what is this. you would have to explain, it's your country. there's another thing, i think you brought up a good point, joe. afghanistan is not iraq. you are right. there's a crucial player, though that factors in. that's iran. iran is not only very active and involved, but in addition to that, iran
is occurring in yemen? >> pakistan is probably larger than any of them. afghanistan is a distraction. one thing about afghanistan, when you had the attacks on the hotel, it went back to vietnam. it's a reminder the people we are working with in afghanistan, given what they get out of pakistan, they will not be able to turn the corner. we continue to invest enormously there. >> howard dean? >> afghanistan, because of the leadership there, no matter what we do, it doesn't matter. karzai is hopeless. i'm more optimistic. if you look at it over many, many years, tunisia is a bright star. egypt is not going to be a democracy in the way we know it. yemen is a huge problem. libya, who knows. i think there's progress that's been made here. i agree there's a lot of countries not making progress. syria, who knows what's going to happen. there will be real gains. >> i kind of agree with governor dean. in yemen, if we have what you describe, the potential for ungovernable state, it will become a petri dish of groups. they may be highly dysfunctional, but not failed. how does the u.s. not send some kind of
help align al-qaida with affiliate groups, yemen, pakistan and elsewhere around the world. >> we showed you a shocking video. stage collapses at a cheap trick concert. investigators are trying to figure out what caused it. they think it was due to a freak storm which blew in but they are still checking construction for design errors. the stage is built to sustain winds at 75 miles an hour. the winds in ottawa are believed to be stronger than that. >> two robbers armed with a rifle hold up a smoke shop but they're no match for paco, the attack chihuahua. >> come on. get down. get down! get down! [dog barking] >> that is one brave chihuahua. this happened in california. paco chased the robbers right out of the store. his owner thankful that his fearless friends did not get hurt. >> when i saw them pointing a gun at paco, it just kind of sent chills down my back. >> the suspects did get away with 200 bucks. it would have been much more if it weren't for paco the chihuahua. >> some tough guys. before you pass judgment on those robbers and their toughness, remember how tough gin-gin was,
at the indian subcontinent, the population is 1.4 billion, same as china, which includes bangladesh and pakistan of it. it's a lot of people in a small area, but they're running out of water, particularly in india. they're overpumping their aquefers, their wells are running dry. and they're projected to grow by 1 million people in the years ahead. subsaharan africa has morelan l, but its population is growing very fast, and it doesn't have the resources to develop the productivity of the land fully. so that's the problem there. and the hunger and malnutrition in the world is concentrated in the indian subcontinent and subsaharan africa. >> do you think the rest of the world -- there's been a big call from the u.n. to say, we need to help these people. is there help available in the rest of the world with the economy teetering the way it is? a lot of countries saying we'd like to help. but we just can't. >> if it's just the horn of africa, 10 million people, 12 million people, that's large. if it becomes bigger and affects a number of countries, then it would be scramble time. the question is how
, but it will be this emerging theater of war on terror, somalia, yemen and still pakistan and the traditional concerns about north korea and iran. iran may prove, kyra, to be topping the list in the months and years to come. a lot of concern that the regime is getting very involved in afghanistan, in iraq, and really trying to exert its influence throughout that region. so all of this list of countries are going to be the things that petraeus will be dealing with as director petraeus one he's no longer general petraeus. >> it will be interesting to watch the difference that he makes and the changes that he makes. barbara starr from the pentagon. barbara, thanks. >> reporter: sure. >>> told is nelson mandela's birthday. he turns 93, and millions of school children around the country saying happy birthday to mandela before lessons begin today. take a listen. ♪ happy birthday to you ♪ happy birthday to you ♪ happy birthday dear nelson >> how else are people celebrating mandela on this special day? >> reporter: well, it is a special day for south africans, and there was, as you could hear, quite a lot of
and operations really pick up in places like yemen and somalia. of course, top concerns always pakistan and what's going on inside that country and north korea and perhaps the number one target, if you will, for gathering intelligence about what they are up to may well be iran. the u.s. believes iran is really trying to extend its influence in both afghanistan and iraq and around the world. there will be a lot of effort over the coming years to see what iran is up to. general petraeus in charge of all of that now as director petraeus. we will see if he gives up the nickname he had for so many years since he attended west point where his cadet, fellow cadet buddies, used to call him peaches petraeus. >> where's the peaches come from? >> you know, guys at the academy, they just sort of make stuff up. i found out recently that amongst his buddies, his fellow former cadets, many of them now two, three, four-star generals themselves, that name peaches petraeus has stuck over the years. close friends, amongst others, maybe behind his back. not too much to his face. he's often called king david petraeu
, israel, indonesia and pakistan. interestingly enough, 75% of people in egypt said arabs not responsible for 9/11. >> should we cue up some bin laden tapes where he's admitting the entire thing or khali shaikh mohammed talking about how the plot was put together or the video confessions of those suicide -- of the suicide terrorists before they died? i mean, would that help? that's not even a tough question. >> it isn't a tough question. >> yet the disconnect continues to be there. we always hear that, it makes no sense obviously to us here. meanwhile, let's get to your headlines. >> we will indeed. defense lawyers plan to present an insanity defense today in the arkansas murder trial of abdul akim muhammad accused of killing one soldier and wounding another outside an army recruiting station in little rock. muhammad insists he's not insane and claims his actions were justified by the quran. >> a texas man who was kidnapped has been found dead in mexico. police say he was murdered after his family could not pay a $10,000 ransom. he worked as a federal court interpreter in el paso and was
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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